~Weak Two Bids and Preempts (an alternate evaluation system)

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In trick evaluation, count any of the missing top three honors as losers. The value of a preemptive system is due to the possibility that even if the opponents have game, they may not find it due to the limited bidding room left. If the opponents do have game, you can afford to go down 3 tricks (doubled, non-vulnerable) and 2 tricks (doubled, vulnerable) (the rule of 3 and 2) and break even (in most cases)–or even make a better score than the opponents. With favorable vulnerability, a weak two-bid may be made with only 4 sure tricks in hand. Weak two-bids and preempts work most effectively when the opponents are vulnerable and you are not.

2D/2H/2S:
~2D: not a particularly effective bid for preemptive purposes; few opponents are shut out of the bidding. Many experts suggest another use: Flannery, Mini Roman, or some other bid. As a Weak Two, 2D shows 5-10 HCP, no 4-card major suit, no void, no more than 1 defensive trick, and follows the rule of 2, 3, and 4.
~2H/2S:
~Equal vulnerability: 5-10 HCP, no outside 4-card major, no more than 1 outside A or K, no void, and shows 5 tricks in hand. The hand should contain (in almost all cases) 6+ cards in the trump suit.
~Vulnerable against not: 5-10 HCP, no 4-card major side suit, no more than 1 (but at least 1) outside A or K, no void, and shows 6 tricks in hand. The hand should contain in almost all cases 6+ cards in the trump suit headed by at least 2 honors, preferably 2 of the top 3 honors or 3 of the top 5 honors.
~Favorable vulnerability: May be 4 tricks short of the bid.
~After a Weak Two-bid , partner may inquire about your side-suit features or strength by bidding 2NT. Three of the long suit denies, if playing “features.” Features usually means a suit of 2+ cards headed by at least a king.
~3C/3D: Observe the Rule of 2, 3, and 4.
~Equal Vulnerability: 5-10 HCP: shows no more than one defensive trick, no void, no 4-card major side suit, and 6 tricks in hand.
~Vulnerable against not: 8-10 HCP , shows 2 of the top 3 honors, no more than one defensive trick, no void, no 4-card major side suit, and 7 tricks in hand.
~Some play that these bids are searching for a 3NT contract if partner has appropriate values. These players require that the bidder have two of the top three honors in the trump suit. Others use the bid primarily for its preemptive value and relax the suit requirements. These bids will not
shut out the 13+-point hand with an appropriate overcall, but will limit the opponents’ bidding space. In addition, game may still be possible for your side at 3NT.
~Favorable Vulnerablity: shows same basic shape and holdings except with 5 tricks in hand.
~3H/3S: Observe the Rule of 2, 3, and 4.
~Equal Vulnerability: shows 5-10 HCP, no void, no more than one defensive trick, no other 4-card major, and 6 tricks in hand.
~Vulnerable against not: Same, except shows 7 tricks in hand.
~Favorable Vulnerability: Same, except with 5 tricks in hand.
Some players like to preempt any time they have 6 or 7 cards in a suit. Such undisciplined preemptive bids are a dual-edged sword–they do create a problem for the opponents, but they also create a problem for partner when he has a good hand. This problem may be minimized by using a disciplined approach to bidding preempts.
~A “feature” is an ace or king, not a second suit.
Your seat position is important in your decision to bid or not.
~In 1st position, you know nothing about the opponents’ hands, but the odds are in their favor.
~In second position, you are in a 50/50 situation.
~In third position, the odds favor the opposition.
~In 4th position, the points appear to be split about evenly–maybe even slightly in your favor as 3rd seat would likely open with 10+points and a decent suit. Game is unlikely for either team. Spades is the master suit; a weak 2S may win the auction. For this reason, some experts advocate a preemptive bid of 2S with only 5 spades and a good preemptive hand in 4th seat.

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