~A Minor Suit Preemptive Hand

Here is a typical Preemptive hand in a minor suit:
S T5
H 7
D AKJ5432
C Q54
When you open three of a minor, you promise 8-10 HCP, a strong suit (two of the top 3 or three of the top 5 honors) of 7 cards and less than two quick tricks. The hand should not hold a void or a 4-card major. The bid tells partner that you have a long strong suit with very little outside strength. The bid invites partner to bid 3NT holding 2+ cards in the long minor and stoppers in all the side suits. The bid is a try for 3NT if partner has the right cards with 5 of the minor also a possibility. Another purpose of the 3-level preemptive bid is to make it more difficult for the opponents to find their fit. The hand usually meets the requirements of the Rule of Twenty; there may be the possibility of opening at the 1-level.

Preempting in a major suit is a bit different. The high card strength may be less–generally 5-10 HCP and a 7-card suit; with unfavorable vulnerability, the hand and suit should be stronger. Again the hand should not contain two quick tricks, a void, or an outside 4-card major. The primary purpose of a 3H or 3S bid is to interfere with the opponents’ bidding. If partner has a good hand, game may be possible; but more likely in 4 of the major, not 3NT. A 3H or 3S bid is more preemptive than three of a minor, because there are fewer bids available at the 3-level.

Bidders may preempt as high as the partnership feels comfortable doing so, but preemptive bids at the four and five levels are common. These bids usually are made with an 8-card or longer suit. The four hands are shown below:
North
S T5
H 7
D AKJ5432
C Q54
West East
S A764 S KJ32
H QT862 H A543
D 76 D T9
C T3 C K62
South
S Q98
H KJ9
D Q8
C AJ987

Here is a typical Preemptive hand in a minor suit:
S T5
H 7
D AKJ5432
C Q54
When you open three of a minor, you promise 8-10 HCP, a strong suit (two of the top 3 or three of the top 5 honors) of 7 cards and less than two quick tricks. The hand should not hold a void or a 4-card major. The bid tells partner that you have a long strong suit with very little outside strength. The bid invites partner to bid 3NT holding 2+ cards in the long minor and stoppers in all the side suits. The bid is a try for 3NT if partner has the right cards with 5 of the minor also a possibility. Another purpose of the 3-level preemptive bid is to make it more difficult for the opponents to find their fit. The hand usually meets the requirements of the Rule of Twenty; there may be the possibility of opening at the 1-level.

Preempting in a major suit is a bit different. The high card strength may be less–generally 5-10 HCP and a 7-card suit; with unfavorable vulnerability, the hand and suit should be stronger. Again the hand should not contain two quick tricks, a void, or an outside 4-card major. The primary purpose of a 3H or 3S bid is to interfere with the opponents’ bidding. If partner has a good hand, game may be possible; but more likely in 4 of the major, not 3NT. A 3H or 3S bid is more preemptive than three of a minor, because there are fewer bids available at the 3-level.

Bidders may preempt as high as the partnership feels comfortable doing so, but preemptive bids at the four and five levels are common. These bids usually are made with an 8-card or longer suit. The four hands are shown below:
North S T5 H 7 D AKJ5432 C Q54
West S A764 H QT862 D 76 C T3
East S KJ32 H A543 D T9 C K62
South S Q98 H KJ9 D Q8 C AJ987

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